Last Issue — End of the Trail

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During our our little excursion out west, back in August and September of 2914, we drove over 2,000 miles and ambled through parts of Nebraska, Colorado, Utah, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. One of the most interesting stops was when Peggy and I spent two or three nights with our r-e-a-l-l-y long-time friend, Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns, at her lovely and comfortable loghouse on the prairie.

2014--09--05  055A  Newcastle. Wyoming  --logo --   by Stan  Paregien

Yessire, bob. Welcome to the wide open spaces.

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Entranceway to Rhonda’s place.

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2014--09--05  065B  Newcastle. Wyoming  -- Rhonda Stearn's horses   --   by Peggy  Paregien

Three of Rhonda’s horses came up each day for some food and lovin’.

2014--09--07  005--B  Rhonda Stearns -- 1995 book, THE KEITH W AVERY STORY

This is one of several books which Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns has written. This non-fiction book is her story of the life Keith W. Avery, who was a respected Western artist. In addition, he was a knowledgeable horseman, rodeo competitor and cowboy, not to mention his decades as a high school teacher.

2014--09--05  076A  Newcastle. Wyoming  -- Canyon Springs Stage Stop Steakhouse  --   by Stan  Paregien

2014--09--05  076B  Newcastle. Wyoming  -- Canyon Springs Stage Stop Steakhouse  --   by Stan  Paregien

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Rhonda took us a few miles to the northeast of Newcastle to this fine restaurant. It is snuggled down in the canyons, the pine trees and the deer and the pronghorn antelope. You talk about rustlin’ up a really tasty steak.  Oooo, weee! Thes folks presented me with one of the doggone tastiest steaks my ol’ lips ever wrapped around. Mighty nice steaks and might nice folks, too.

2014--09--06  005--E  Newcastle. Wyoming  -- Rhonda Stearns and her dog Bob

Here on July 20, 2015, I have added a link to a video I made of Bob the cowdog playing pool on top of the pool table. Alas, Bob is no longer a spring chicken so she, like many of us, is pretty stove up. Still, she (yes, Bob is a female cowdog) does the best she can at “Senior Citizen speed” and seems to enjoy it. I posted it on YouTube and here is the link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hAcxfDdsiQU

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2014--09--06  038B  Newcastle. Wyoming  --  Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns and late husband Will

Will Stearns was a no-nonse, straight-ahead cowboy when he married our little Rhonda. Together they worked hard to scrape out a living. They were both cowboys who loved the land, the livestock and the people of the area. While they always had their own place to work, they also hired out to other ranches to help their neighbors with the fall and spring roundups, the doctoring, branding and such. They were often in the saddle from before sunup until after dark, no matter whether it was blowing snow or raining so hard they had trouble getting through the mud and the runoffs.

Will died in March of 2013. He had requested a true cowboy funeral. So his friends and neighbors built a beautiful wood casket for him, put his body in it and transported it to an old cowboy cemetery southwest of their house. And they did so in a wooden, horse-drawn wagon. He was buried in a quite pasture a long way from the highway. We miss you Will, but we plan on seeing you at the Great Reuion one day. 

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2014--09--06--B   Lubbock, TX - June 9, 2002 - Will and Rhonda Stearns - Stan Paregien - National Cowboy Symposium - by P Paregien

Believe me, I have known a large number of very fine and generous and kind people in my 73+ years.  Most of those names you wouldn’t even know. But some of them have been famous in business or politics, the movies or on TV shows, or in rodeos, or as talented authors and poets and valuable contributors to their own town and/or state. A select few ever achieve national prominence.

However, this was my very first time to go visit a friend who has done that. Though she is still traveling to speaking engagements, writing newspaper columns and cowboy poetry, she already has a monument erected at the park near the fairgrounds. Yep, that is none other than our friend Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns. She is quite a lady and is an influential witness for Christ no matter where she may be.

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I don’t know who made the following statement, but it certainly does apply to Rhonda. I am proud to know her, not just as a great writer and cowboy poet, but as my sister in Jesus Christ. She, as always, has been an encouragement to both Peggy and to me. As the cowboys say of dependable and trusty pards in difficult circumstances, “She would do to ride the river with.”

2014--09--07  012  Newcastle. Wyoming  -- quote  --  by Peggy Paregien

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Keith W. Avery,

Renaissance Cowboy

 

by Stan Paregien Sr

Copyrighted July 10, 2015

Keith W. Avery was born on Dec. 3, 1921,

Over in Lansing, Michigan’s west side.

However, when he was nearly age three,

They moved to rural Lowell to long abide.

 It was a magic place with large maple trees,

And plenty of places for a kids to hide.

His parents taught him early that laziness

And dishonesty they would not abide.

 

Well, Keith went to a school with eight classes

In a one-room school far from any town.

While he was smart and learned quickly,

Often he was bored and played the clown.

 

One day, while his female teacher spoke,

He was clowning around with a certain pal.

She stopped and asked what he was saying.

“None of your business,” he said to the gal.

 

Keith had never been sucker-punched ’til then.

She gave him a knuckle sandwich to his jaw.

That cured the class clown of his rude behavior,

And–worse–someone told his ma and his pa.

 

Funny how things turn out, ’cause he loved

That woman for teaching him about respect.

And she taught him some folks really care,

And so he learned a lot from being decked.

 

Now the ancient Hebrew language was written

And read from right to left, so we are told.

Maybe that’s why Keith W. Avery’s teacher

And mom came up with a reading plan so bold.

 

You see, young Keith had a phenomenal memory,

So rather than read he memorized and recited stuff.

But his 2nd grade teacher and his mother knew

His odd way of learning would never be enough.

 

So to wean him away from his unique behavior,

They made him read from right to left.

Now that was a doggone big challenge for the kid,

But at “reading backward” he was quite adept.

 

Yes, in a matter of months he had learned to read well,

Rather than to memorize, so he got up to speed.

But all the rest of his days folks thought him kinda odd

For starting at the back of any book he wanted to read.

 

By the time he was in high school in Lowell, Michigan

He had another . . . , well, big mouth he had to feed.

That was no small expense to provide room and board

To his hungry horse, even if it was a pretty steed.

 

That’s when, to afford his horse, he ran a paper route

Seven miles long, out there in the country, of course.

Keith earned enough money for his equine expenses,

But the best part was he ran the route on his horse.

 

When winter time in Michigan set in, that was a test.

He often returned home in the dark, ’bout half-froze.

He’d dismount and liven his feet by kicking the barn,

Then he’d scrape ice from his gloves and his nose.

 Avery, Keith -- date unknown - from Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns' book 

Why, back in about 1950 he was at Bartlesville, Okla.,

Ranching for hire and riding bulls and broncs for fun.

It was the thrill of the ride that really had him hooked,

Not to mention getting a nice check when he was done.

 

At various times he was a horse trainer, breeder, judge,

Trader, showman and rodeo producer to boot.

If there was a horse somehow involved in an event,

Keith W. Avery was probably there, the horses to salute.

  

Avery did not begin college until he was 30 years old,

But he excelled at the University at Las Cruces, N.M.

Even while deep in studies, he cleaned out stables, and

Trained horses to help bring home the necessary dough.

 

Keith, with a few detours, became a high school teacher

Because it paid to support what he really like to do.

That was to read, write his poems and paint with his brush,

When he wasn’t riding a horse or cooking up a stew.

 

He had begun writing general poetry way back in 1942,

When of all things he was a sergeant in the U.S. Army.

In 1990 he wrote a book, Ridden Hard and Put Up Wet,

A self-illustrated collection of his own cowboy poetry.

 

In 1995 along came writer Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns

With Trails of a Wanderer: The Keith W. Avery Story.

An experienced  rancher, horse woman and author,

Rhonda told his tale with insights only she could see.

 

Fact is, pards, Keith W. Avery was a solid citizen cowboy,

One who never partied, got drunk or even swore.

He just never bought into the popular myth that a person

Had to do those kinds of things or life would be a bore.

 

Avery was a multi-talented sort of renaissance man–

A rodeo star, a teacher, a poet, and businessman.

And he was of the old school regarding business ethics,

For he accepted a man’s word and the shake of his hand.

 

He liked to call himself a  wide-eyed wanderer,

‘Cause he loved to travel far and even near.

Travel, for him, was both fun and enlightening,

So he wandered here and there with no fear.

 

But he was always more at peace with himself

When around horses and back country land.

So Keith Avery always had horses in his barn

And a paint brush or a writing pen in his hand.

 

He was on the board of many horse organizations,

But the American Paint Horse Association was best.

He dearly loved those paint and pinto breed horses,

Not that he had any less appreciation for the rest.

 

Sadly, Keith Avery in his last years lost his vision.

Macular degeneration ended his ability to paint.

Not only that, but he couldn’t see the horse colors

Or a sunset, but he suffered with great restraint.

 

So, my friends, the next time you’re out in the wild,

Think how this horseman followed his very own plan.

Raise a glass or a coffee cup toward the north star,

And salute Keith Avery, for he was a real good man.

———————————————————————–

Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns’ book, Trails of a Wanderer:

The Keith W. Avery Story was published by Guy Logsdon

Books in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1995 for The Cheff Center

For the Handicapped, Inc., in Battle Creek, Michigan.

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2000  --  FARM AND RANCH  Dec-Jan, 2000  - page 50  -- singing weatherman cartoon

Cowboys  -- just another beatup cowboy  -- George Bush

Do you remember this ol’ cowhand from the Rio Grande?

Cowboys -- I'm a vegetarian since cows eat grass and I eat cows

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Fred and Barbara McGinn, long-time friends of ours who live in Edmond, Oklahoma, two different summers have had us up to their large and comfortable cabin near Westcliffe, Colorado for a few days. That 5+ bedroom cabin is surrounded by tall pine trees and gorgeous birch trees. In 2014 we were joined there by other close friends–Tom and Sue Gooch and James and Glenda Cotton, all certified Edmondites.

There’s never a traffic snarl up there. Hardly any noise, unless you call the wind blowing through the trees a noise. We drink coffee and eat, go for walks, drink coffee and eat, drive around to see the deer and the other wildlife, drink coffee and eat, play cards and usually go to a Sunday non-denomination church service outdoor among the birch. Last year, Fred kindly arranged for me to do the preaching there for some 30 or so friendly folks. A deer actually saundered through the woods behind me as I spoke. That sunny Sunday morning it didn’t matter what our politics were like, what our occupations or ages were, what our bank accounts looked like or what denomination we normally met with. We were level at the cross. Believers from many different states and backgrounds. We had a fine service and then enjoyed a potluck meal together, all in a small clearning under a canoply of trees. Friends, it doesn’t get much better than that.

That evening, the eight of us drove to the north side of tiny Westcliffe to attend a, . . . well, a different kind of worship. We met with the friendly and enthusiastic ranch folk at the Westcliffe Cowboy Church. Their music was of the country-Western variety, with Christian lyrics layered over some well-known melodies and played by four or five talented musicians. We were all blessed by being there with them.

The cowboy church there is just a few years old, but they have a nice “Western-style” building filled with Western-style decoration. And get this: their several acres of land and buildings are their’s, not the bank’s. Their mission has been and is to reach the unchurched cowboys in the area. The preacher explained that they did not want to “steal sheep” from other congreations and haven’t. They are making a real impact in the lives of people in that area who are involved in the ranching industry or who simply love the cowboy lifestyle. Jeans, cowboy hats and boots are the order of the day.

As visitors, each of our couples was given a “Cowboy New Testament.” Here are some photos of this NIV version. Needless to say, I was just a “w-e-e bit” surprised to open it up and see the faces of two cowboys (and Christian singers) Peggy and I know. That was R.W. Hampton and Jeff Gore, really fine entertainers and excellent witnesses for the Lord.

Cowboys and Religion -- NIV Bible for Cowboys -- page 01

Cowboys and Religion -- NIV Bible for Cowboys -- page 02 Cowboys and Religion -- NIV Bible for Cowboys -- page 03

Cowboys and Religion -- NIV Bible for Cowboys -- page 4

Cowboys and Religion -- NIV Bible for Cowboys -- page 5

Well, buckeroos and buckerettes, that’s all there is. There ain’t no more. 

This marks the very last issue of my THE COWBOY WAY blog, barring some miracle of resurrection a long way down the road. Due to health issues and other considerations,  I am consolidating this blog and my STAN’S PARADISE REPORT blog into my THE PAREGIEN JOURNAL blog, located at http://www.paregien.wordpress.com .Writing this blog has been a fun and a satisfying ride for me.

Also, I will continue publishing every two months to my new web site, STORYTELLING DIGEST (http://www.storytellingdigest.com). 

I hope you’ll mosey over and take a look at the two which are left standing.

— Stan Paregien

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The Ten Commandments: Cowpoke Style

Howdy, Y’all:

I have included another of my poems, “An Ancestor Gone Bad,” and this article/essay directly below, “The Ten Commandments: Cowpoke Style.” Those plus some cartoons and other items. 

Last week I attended a seminar on “Five Hundred Centuries of Raising Cattle in Florida.” It was held in the historic Methodist Church, one of many old structures at Manatee Village in Bradenton, Florida. I got there a little early, and I’m glad I did since all the seats were soon filled and scores of folks were standing at the rear of the auditorium. 

Florida folks like to trace their cattle ranching heritage all the way back to 1521 when the Spanish explorer Ponce de Leon landed near present-day Charlotte Harbor, Florida. There he unloaded many Spanish horses, cattle and other stock. That small number of Spanish cattle became the origin of what we call today the Florida “Cracker Cows” — a relatively small breed with upturned horns and drooping ears. They were perfectly adapted for Florida’s heat and humidity. Some today say that you could stake a Cracker Cow out on a Walmart parking lot and it would still gain weight. Because of the abundance of grass and maybe an over-abundance of water, these sturdy animals thrived out on the open range.

More about Cracker cows and cowboys at a later time.

Paregien, Stan -- The Ten Commandments, Cowpoke Style -- copyrighted Feb 9, 2015 - Exodus 20

Executive Orders - by 'Lone Ranger' Obama and 'Tonto Biden' - Bradenton Herald - 2014--07--8

Cowboys -- Dennis the Menace - what words do I need to know

Cowboy - with rope and in a relaxed mood

Cowboys -- prairie -- divorce -- Shoe cartoon - Feb, 2015

Cowboys - there's a little cowboy in all of us

Poem 403   An Ancestor Gone Bad - by Stan Paregien -- Nov 30, 2014

Baxter Black - Lookin' for Cowboys  - undated

The above humorous essay by ol’ Baxter Black was given to me by friend Carl Byers. He and the little Mrs., Joann, hang their Stetson hats right across the street from us. 

Cows -- grasstures -- Peanuts cartoon

Besides this new posting, I’ve also added new material at my “Stan’s Paradise Report” under the title, “Florida’s Good, Bad and . . . Well, You Know.” And I have added items at my blog, “The Paregien Journal” under the title, “

Oh, hey, one more thing. Peggy and I made a 7-day cruise through the Western Caribbean recently. We took quite a few photos. If you’d like to see them, just go to:

https://www.flickr.com//photos/114140996@N07/

See ya down the trail.

— Stan

A 100% Cowboy Christmas — Poems, Songs and More

Hello all you buckeroos and buckerettes . . . and wanna be cowboys and cowgirls, too.

You have probably already heard this from the greeter at Walmart, . . . but I wish you a very merry and meaningful Christmas.

This particular blog features cowboy poetry and songs and more. There is the song, “A Christmas Prayer” by the late, great talent Marty Robbins (“White Sport Coat,” “Devil Woman,” “El Paso,” etc.); and a song by Moe Bandy titled, “Cowboy Christmas.”

Then here is a poem titled “Christmas In a Line Shack” by our Oklahoma rancher friend LeRoy Jones, plus four poems by the legendary cowboy poet S. Omar Barker (“The Cowboy’s Christmas Prayer,” “Drylander’s Christmas,” “One Snowy Christmas,” and “Noche Buena.” You’ll want to share that last one, especially, for all your Spanish speaking friends.

In addition, I’m throwing in these Christmas-related poems of mine: “Christmas Delight” –my oldest (my 29th poem, written in 1990), and my favorite;  “The Eternal Optimist;” “The Cowboy Santa,” and my latest and most politically correct poem, “A Holiday Greeting.”

Poem by S Omar Barker - Noche Buena - in THE ROUNDUP for Dec, 1976, page 25

Poem - Christmas in a Line Shack - by LeRoy Jones of Mt View, Oklahoma on Dec 27, 2008 --  Page 1 of 2

Poem - Christmas in a Line Shack - by LeRoy Jones of Mt View, Oklahoma on Dec 27, 2008 --  Page 2 of 2

Poem 205  --  The Cowboy Santa  - copyrighted by Stan Paregien in 1999  -  Page 1 of 3

Poem 205  --  The Cowboy Santa  - copyrighted by Stan Paregien in 1999  -  Page 2 of 3

Poem 205  --  The Cowboy Santa  - copyrighted by Stan Paregien in 1999  -  Page 3 of 3

Poem by S Omar Barker - One Snowy Christmas Eve - in THE ROUNDUP for Dec, 1978, page 7

autrycard

The above card was one that Gene Autry (the “rock star”) of his day used during World War II.

Already a pilot, he flew transport airplanes in the Army Air Corps over the dangerous “Burma run.”

Christmas - Christmas tree topped by a cowboy hat -- 01

Now there’s a decorating idea for your own Christmas tree.

xmas-wierd

1894--TX--Midland--city life on Christmas Day in 1894

Cowboys -- two boys in cowboy outfits they got for Christmas, with their ray-guns

Cowboy Christmas - recorded by Moe Bandy

Poem 105  -  The Eternal Optimist - copyrighted by Stan Paregien in 2002  -- Page 1 of 2

Poem 105  -  The Eternal Optimist - copyrighted by Stan Paregien in 2002  -- Page 2 of 2

Poem by S Omar Barker - Drylander's Christmas - in THE ROUNDUP for Dec, 1973, page 14

Christmas--FamilyCircus--reindeer-easier-to-ride

Christmas--reindeer--Gene Autry record album--Rudolph

Christmas Prayer - written and performed by Marty Robbins

Poem 029  A Rancher's Christmas Delight - copyrighted by Stan Paregien in 1990 -- Page 1 of 3

Poem 029  A Rancher's Christmas Delight - copyrighted by Stan Paregien in 1990 -- Page 2 of 3

Poem 029  A Rancher's Christmas Delight - copyrighted by Stan Paregien in 1990 -- Page 3 of 3

S Omar Barker, 'The Cowboy's Christmas Prayer'

That’s about it for now, friends and neighbors along the internet trail. See ya next time.

— Stan Paregien

Cowboy Legacy in Colorado and Idaho

During last August, Peggy and I took the longest vacation trip of any that either of us had ever done. We flew to St. Louis and visited people, flew to Omaha and visited people in Lincoln and over in Kearney. Then we flew from Omaha to Denver, rented a car and began our “land cruise.” We cruised right on through Colorado, Utah, Idaho, over to Montana, down to Montana, then down to Wyoming and returned our rental car back to Denver and flew back home to Florida on September 11th. 

We kept bumping into cowboy-related things or people or animals. So I thought I would share a few photos of that aspect of our trip. Here we go.

2014--08--15  001A   vacation -- Colorado --

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The owner of this store in Florence, Colorado turned out to also be an accomplished artist and Western novelist. He has about six novels to his credit, and he did the artwork for each of the covers. Sure are lots of talented folks out there.

2014--08--15  021   Canon City,  Colorado --  Roy Rogers drink  -  by Glenda Cotton

We and our friends James and Glenda Cotton ate supper one night at a Mexican restaurant in Canon City, Colorado. I was intrigued by the fact that on their drink list was a “Roy Rogers” drink right along with a “Shirley Temple.” When our congenial waiter brought a single check, Peggy said to him: “Oh, please, we would like to have one check for each couple.” The 45-ish waiter smiled and said, “Oh, no problem at all.” And with that he tore the check in two and handed half to Peggy and the other half to our friends. We were all kinda stunned for just a few seconds, then we all broke out laughing. Then he brought two checks. I got the impression he had enjoyed pulling that little joke on lots of other diners, too.

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The photos here, about this cowboy church, were actually taken in 2012 when I first discovered it on my initial visit to Westcliffe, Colorado. Preacher Smith told me that the congregation’s mission is to convert to Christ “the unchurched cowboys and ranchers in this area. We are not going after any other church’s members. And we have found a real need here in this valley for such a mission. This church property, including every building on it, is paid for.”

They tell first time attendees that they are welcome. But they make clear they do not have a normal “church membership role.” They consider this body of believers to be a family and all are welcome. They do practice baptism by immersion, and they have communion every Sunday. Rather than passing around a collection plate, they simply have an offering box just inside the auditorium. And that auditorium, by the way, is decorated cowboy style with mounted heads of trophy deer and elk around the room.

They have a band composed of very good musicians. And they largely use country music songs which have had the original words changed to a Christian message with a cowboy slant, when possible.

???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? They even have a rodeo arena on their land. They hold calf ropings and mutton bustings every once in a while for entertainment and to further interest cowboys and ranchers in the message of the Gospel.

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2014--08--19  030  Gunnison, CO  --  Curecanti National Recreation Area  -- by Stan Paregien

2014--08--19  032  Gunnison, CO  --  Curecanti National Recreation Area  -- by Stan Paregien

2014--08--19  049  Montrose, CO  --  'A Bad Decision' - statue of cowboy roping a buck  -- by Stan Paregien

2014--08--19  050  Montrose, CO  --  'A Bad Decision' - statue of cowboy roping a buck  -- by Stan Paregien

2014--08--22   001--C   greetings from Idaho

2014--08--22  006--W  Twin Falls, Idaho  --  The Snake River near town  --

These folks are enjoying a good ol’ watermellon feast in the area of Twin Falls, Idaho.

2014--08--22  006--X10  Twin Falls, Idaho  --  Cowboys in The Snake River country

The men above have pretty fancy saddles and clothing, so they may have been duded up for a parade or some such in the Twin Falls area of Idaho.

2014--08--25  B30--B  Donally, ID  - cows and old barn on Panther Ranch  - by Stan  Paregien

As a photographer and history enthusiast (i.e., nut), I find it extremely hard to pass up a chance to take a photo of an old barn, or an old ranch house, or an old service station, or an old . . . . Well, you get the idea.

2014--08--25  E40  Harpster, ID  - horse and old barn  --    by Stan  Paregien

I really liked the way the above photo turned out, with the weeds in the foreground the pretty buckskin horse next to the old barn.

On this leg of the trip, we stopped in Spaulding, Idaho (just east of Lewiston) at the National Nez Perce Museum. The photo below shows a Nez Perce man next to his paint horse.

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I was particularly intrigued by the above photo of a Nez Perce man who was a champion rodeo contestant. His name was “Jackson Sundawn” and the writing on the photo says “Champion of the 1916 Round Up.”

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Well, that’s it ol’ pards for this time. Next, we’ll show the cowboy-related items we found in Montana and Wyoming. That includes several photos of a visit with had in Newcastle, Wyoming with our long-time friend Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns. She spent her life growing up on ranches and working for other ranchers in the eastern part of Wyoming. Her many books and countless poems are authentic reflections of her own experiences and of folks she has known.

Adios for now.

When you get time, please take a look at my two other blogs:

          The Paregien Journal  (www.paregien.wordpress.com)

          Stan’s Paradise Report  (on living in Florida;  www.stansparadisereport.com)

–Stan

My Cowboy Roots, Part 3: 1980 to 1987

Hey, come on in and sit a spell. I’ve rustled up some vintage cowboy photos from the years of 1980 to 1987. Plenty of ’em. And some mighty good ones. So fill your coffee cup and then saddle up and lets ride together along the ol’ memory trail.

Stacy Paregien sitting on her pinto shetland pony, whose name I cannot recall. Winter of 1980, north of Stroud, Okla. Photo by Stan Paregien
Stacy Paregien sitting on her pinto shetland pony, whose name I cannot recall. Winter of 1980, north of Stroud, Okla. Photo by Stan Paregien
Stacy Paregien and her older brother, Gene (starting with his Air Force days in 1985, he would be called Stan). She is on her pony and he on his motorcycle which we forbade him from riding out on the highway. We had lots of pasture and county roads available. Photo by Stan Paregien
Stacy Paregien and her older brother, Gene (starting with his Air Force days in 1985, he would be called Stan). She is on her pony and he on his motorcycle which we forbade him from riding out on the highway. We had lots of pasture and county roads available. Photo by Stan Paregien
Stacy Paregien and her older brother, Gene (starting with his Air Force days in 1985, he would be called Stan). She is on her pony and he on his motorcycle which we forbade him from riding out on the highway. We had lots of pasture and county roads available. Photo by Stan Paregien
Stacy Paregien and her older brother, Gene (starting with his Air Force days in 1985, he would be called Stan). She is on her pony and he on his motorcycle which we forbade him from riding out on the highway. We had lots of pasture and county roads available. Photo by Stan Paregien
Don and Sharon Mentzer, our neighbors and very close friends, give Peggy Paregien and Stacy some pointers about her pinto shetland pony. Photo by Stan Paregien in the winter of 1980, north of Stroud, OK.
Don and Sharon Mentzer, our neighbors and very close friends, give Peggy Paregien and Stacy some pointers about her pinto shetland pony. Photo by Stan Paregien in the winter of 1980, north of Stroud, OK.

 

I got to meet famed Western novelist Louis L'Amour in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1980 as he got off his tour bus to attend a book signing. Photo copyrighted by Stan Paregien
I got to meet famed Western novelist Louis L’Amour in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1980 as he got off his tour bus to attend a book signing. Photo copyrighted by Stan Paregien

 

I got to meet famed Western novelist Louis L'Amour in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1980 as he got off his tour bus to attend a book signing. Photo copyrighted by Stan Paregien
I got to meet famed Western novelist Louis L’Amour in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1980 as he got off his tour bus to attend a book signing. Photo copyrighted by Stan Paregien

 

Stan Paregien with daughter Stacy and son Gene in front of the shed part of our big, red barn at our place north of Stroud, Okla., in 1981. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Stan Paregien with daughter Stacy and son Gene in front of the shed part of our big, red barn at our place north of Stroud, Okla., in 1981. Photo by Peggy Paregien

 

This is our version of the legendary "Wild Bunch." Left to right are Woody King, Gene Paregien, Gene's grandmother Evelyn Cauthen Paregien, her boyfriend (later 2nd husband) Chester Spradling and Jeff King. Photo taken in 1981 on our place north of Stroud, Okla. Photo by Stan Paregien
This is our version of the legendary “Wild Bunch” (or “Duck Dynasty” or “Swamp People” or somethin’ like that). Woolie boogers, left to right, are Woody King, Gene Paregien, Gene’s grandmother Evelyn Cauthen Paregien, her boyfriend (later 2nd husband) Chester Spradling and Jeff King. Photo taken in 1981 on our place north of Stroud, Okla. Photo by Stan Paregien

 

Stan Paregien with son Gene Paregien out in the "bush" country, north of Stroud, Okla., in the summer of 1981. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Stan Paregien with son Gene Paregien out in the “bush” country, north of Stroud, Okla., in the summer of 1981. Photo by Peggy Paregien

 

Stacy Paregien rides her horse, Dolly, through our back pasture north of Stroud, Okla., in 1982. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Stacy Paregien rides her horse, Dolly, through our back pasture north of Stroud, Okla., in 1982. Photo by Peggy Paregien

 

Stan Paregien in the winter of 1983 at our place north of Stroud, Okla. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Stan Paregien in the winter of 1983 at our place north of Stroud, Okla. Photo by Peggy Paregien

 

A visit to the "Will Rogers Memorial" in Claremore, Oklahoma in 1983. Shown are Gene Paregien, his parents Stan and Peggy, and his sister Stacy.
A visit to the “Will Rogers Memorial” in Claremore, Oklahoma in 1983. Shown are Gene Paregien, his parents Stan and Peggy, and his sister Stacy.

 

Gene Paregien is shown inside of the "Tom Mix Museum" in Dewey, Oklahoma in 1983. Tom Mix was in the 101 Wild West Show, then was a cowboy movie star. Photo by Stan Paregien
Gene Paregien is shown inside of the “Tom Mix Museum” in Dewey, Oklahoma in 1983. Tom Mix was in the 101 Wild West Show, then was a cowboy movie star. Photo by Stan Paregien
Stacy Paregien gives encouragement to her friend Kathy Lynn Beckmann (daughter of Kathy Booth Beckmann) who is on her horse Dolly. Photo taken in 1983 at our place north of Stroud, Okla., by Peggy Paregien
Stacy Paregien gives encouragement to her friend Kathy Lynn Beckmann (daughter of Kathy Booth Beckmann) who is on her horse Dolly. Photo taken in 1983 at our place north of Stroud, Okla., by Peggy Paregien

 

This was what Stan and Peggy Paregien's farm house north of Stroud, Okla.,  looked like in the winter of 1983. We wanted a very pale shade of yellow, but the paint job left it looking bright yellow. Oh well. Photo by Stan Paregien.
This was what Stan and Peggy Paregien’s farm house north of Stroud, Okla., looked like in the winter of 1983. We wanted a very pale shade of yellow, but the paint job left it looking bright yellow. Oh well. Photo by Stan Paregien.
Stan Paregien with his mother, Evelyn Cauthen Paregien, at the Los Angeles International Airport in 1984. Photo by Peggy Paregien.
Stan Paregien with his mother, Evelyn Cauthen Paregien, at the Los Angeles International Airport in 1984. Photo by Peggy Paregien.
"History Day" is a nation-wide contest among high school students, and the finalists get to compete in the finals in Washington, D.C. Gene Paregien his his friend Dess Applegate got to compete in the finals two years in a row.
“History Day” is a nation-wide contest among high school students, and the finalists get to compete in the finals in Washington, D.C. Gene Paregien his his friend Dess Applegate got to compete in the finals two years in a row.
"History Day" is a nation-wide contest among high school students, and the finalists get to compete in the finals in Washington, D.C. Gene Paregien his his friend Dess Applegate got to compete in the finals two years in a row.
“History Day” is a nation-wide contest among high school students, and the finalists get to compete in the finals in Washington, D.C. Gene Paregien his his friend Dess Applegate got to compete in the finals two years in a row.
This is a copy of my membership card in the Oklahoma Writers Federation. Noted Western historian (and resident of Perkins, Oklahoma) sent a short note to me.
This is a copy of my membership card in the Oklahoma Writers Federation. Noted Western historian (and resident of Perkins, Oklahoma) sent a short note to me.

 

Jory Sherman and I met in Oklahoma City in 1984. He died 30 years later. In between, he wrote or produced hundreds of Western novels -- some under his own name, but many under other "pen" names.
Jory Sherman and I met in Oklahoma City in 1984. He died 30 years later. In between, he wrote or produced hundreds of Western novels — some under his own name, but many under other “pen” names.

 

Glenn Shirley, in his day, was one of Oklahoma's premiere Western writers and book authors. Photo by Stan Paregien in 1984. Shirley's estate sold his massive book collection to the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum for inclusion in their research department.
Glenn Shirley, in his day, was one of Oklahoma’s premiere Western writers and book authors. Photo by Stan Paregien in 1984. Shirley’s estate sold his massive book collection to the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum for inclusion in their research department.
Stacy Paregien is show here on her new horse, Paula. It was pretty skinny-looking when we got it, but she filled-in nicely and was a very good horse. We even took Paula with us when in 1985 we had to move to Laverne, Oklahoma. We had no land so we boarded her, but that didn't work out well. So Stacy sold it and bought a lovely pomeranian dog which she named Bucky. Photo by Stan Paregien.
Stacy Paregien is show here on her new horse, Paula. It was pretty skinny-looking when we got it, but she filled-in nicely and was a very good horse. We even took Paula with us when in 1985 we had to move to Laverne, Oklahoma. We had no land so we boarded her, but that didn’t work out well. So Stacy sold it and bought a lovely pomeranian dog which she named Bucky. Photo by Stan Paregien.

 

This is the cover one one of Thomas ("Tommy") Thompson's many, many Western novels. He also wrote for TV shows such as Bonanza and Rawhide. He was one of the founders of the Western Writers of America. He was the first person I met when  I attended my first WWA convention, and he made me feel absolutely at home.
This is the cover one one of Thomas (“Tommy”) Thompson’s many, many Western novels. He also wrote for TV shows such as Bonanza and Rawhide. He was one of the founders of the Western Writers of America. He was the first person I met when I attended my first WWA convention, and he made me feel absolutely at home.

 

Thomas ("Tommy") Thompson wrote many Western novels. He also wrote for TV shows such as Bonanza and Rawhide. He was one of the founders of the Western Writers of America. He was the first person I met when  I attended my first WWA convention, and he made me feel absolutely at home.
Thomas (“Tommy”) Thompson wrote many Western novels. He also wrote for TV shows such as Bonanza and Rawhide. He was one of the founders of the Western Writers of America. He was the first person I met when I attended my first WWA convention, and he made me feel absolutely at home.
Stan Paregien, probably in March or so of 1985, at our place north of Stroud, Okla. Because of the recession and businesses closing or consolidating, it was necessary for us to move with Peggy's job with Sun Pipeline to Laverne, Okla. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Stan Paregien, probably in March or so of 1985, at our place north of Stroud, Okla. Because of the recession and businesses closing or consolidating, it was necessary for us to move with Peggy’s job with Sun Pipeline to Laverne, Okla. Photo by Peggy Paregien

 

Stan Paregien, probably in March or so of 1985, at our place north of Stroud, Okla. Because of the recession and businesses closing or consolidating, it was necessary for us to move with Peggy's job with Sun Pipeline to Laverne, Okla. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Stan Paregien, probably in March or so of 1985, at our place north of Stroud, Okla. Because of the recession and businesses closing or consolidating, it was necessary for us to move with Peggy’s job with Sun Pipeline to Laverne, Okla. Photo by Peggy Paregien

 

1985--043--A--ChandlerOK--GlennShirley--May26

 

 

1985--044--A--LaverneOK--our-new-home---502-South-Oklahoma

 

 

1985--044--B--LaverneOK--backyard of our-new-home---502-South Oklahoma

Stacy, Stan, Gene (later also Stan) and Peggy Paregien at their place north of Stroud, Oklahoma. This is probably the last group photo of them on the place before they moved to Laverne, way out in the panhandle of Oklahoma.
Stacy, Stan, Gene (later also Stan) and Peggy Paregien at their place north of Stroud, Oklahoma. This is probably the last group photo of them on the place before they moved to Laverne, way out in the panhandle of Oklahoma.

 

I met Pulitzer Prize winner Larry McMurtry at the 1986 summer convention  in Fort Worth, Texas of the Western Writers of America. He autographed my personal copy of LONESOME DOVE. Photo by Stan Paregien
I met Pulitzer Prize winner Larry McMurtry at the 1986 summer convention in Fort Worth, Texas of the Western Writers of America. He autographed my personal copy of LONESOME DOVE. Photo by Stan Paregien

 

1986--028--Ad---BenJohnsonCelebrityRoping

 

 

For several years in a row, actor and Oklahoma native Ben Johnson held a "Pro-Celebrity Roping Competition" at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla. It was there I got to meet and interview and photograph both Ben Johnson and actor Doug McClure. Johnson, McClure and "The Virginian" star James Drury signed autographs at a Western wear store and I got photos of them there, as well.
For several years in a row, actor and Oklahoma native Ben Johnson held a “Pro-Celebrity Roping Competition” at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla. It was there I got to meet and interview and photograph both Ben Johnson and actor Doug McClure. Johnson, McClure and “The Virginian” star James Drury signed autographs at a Western wear store and I got photos of them there, as well.

 

For several years in a row, actor and Oklahoma native Ben Johnson held a "Pro-Celebrity Roping Competition" at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla. It was there I got to meet and interview and photograph both Ben Johnson and actor Doug McClure. Johnson, McClure and "The Virginian" star James Drury signed autographs at a Western wear store and I got photos of them there, as well.
For several years in a row, actor and Oklahoma native Ben Johnson held a “Pro-Celebrity Roping Competition” at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla. It was there I got to meet and interview and photograph both Ben Johnson and actor Doug McClure. Johnson, McClure and “The Virginian” star James Drury signed autographs at a Western wear store and I got photos of them there, as well.

 

For several years in a row, actor and Oklahoma native Ben Johnson held a "Pro-Celebrity Roping Competition" at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla. It was there I got to meet and interview and photograph both Ben Johnson and actor Doug McClure. Johnson, McClure and "The Virginian" star James Drury signed autographs at a Western wear store and I got photos of them there, as well.
For several years in a row, actor and Oklahoma native Ben Johnson held a “Pro-Celebrity Roping Competition” at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla. It was there I got to meet and interview and photograph both Ben Johnson and actor Doug McClure. Johnson, McClure and “The Virginian” star James Drury signed autographs at a Western wear store and I got photos of them there, as well.

 

For several years in a row, actor and Oklahoma native Ben Johnson held a "Pro-Celebrity Roping Competition" at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla. It was there I got to meet and interview and photograph both Ben Johnson and actor Doug McClure. Johnson, McClure and "The Virginian" star James Drury signed autographs at a Western wear store and I got photos of them there, as well.
For several years in a row, actor and Oklahoma native Ben Johnson held a “Pro-Celebrity Roping Competition” at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla. It was there I got to meet and interview and photograph both Ben Johnson and actor Doug McClure. Johnson, McClure and “The Virginian” star James Drury signed autographs at a Western wear store and I got photos of them there, as well.

 

For several years in a row, actor and Oklahoma native Ben Johnson held a "Pro-Celebrity Roping Competition" at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla. It was there I got to meet and interview and photograph both Ben Johnson and actor Doug McClure. Johnson, McClure and "The Virginian" star James Drury signed autographs at a Western wear store and I got photos of them there, as well.
For several years in a row, actor and Oklahoma native Ben Johnson held a “Pro-Celebrity Roping Competition” at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla. It was there I got to meet and interview and photograph both Ben Johnson and actor Doug McClure. Johnson, McClure and “The Virginian” star James Drury signed autographs at a Western wear store and I got photos of them there, as well.

 

I met this "mountain man" at a ranch sale southwest of Lavern, Oklahoma one snowy day early in 1986. He was riding horseback from Santa Fe all the way to Washington, D.C. I invited him to spend the night with us, and he did. Interesting fellow.
I met this “mountain man,” Chuck Streeper, at a ranch sale southwest of Lavern, Oklahoma one snowy day early in 1986. He was riding horseback from Santa Fe all the way to Washington, D.C. I invited him to spend the night with us, and he did. Interesting fellow.

 

I met this "mountain man" at a ranch sale southwest of Lavern, Oklahoma one snowy day early in 1986. He was riding horseback from Santa Fe all the way to Washington, D.C. I invited him to spend the night with us, and he did. Interesting fellow.
I met this “mountain man” at a ranch sale southwest of Lavern, Oklahoma one snowy day early in 1986. He was riding horseback from Santa Fe all the way to Washington, D.C. I invited him to spend the night with us, and he did. Interesting fellow.

 

I met this "mountain man" at a ranch sale southwest of Lavern, Oklahoma one snowy day early in 1986. He was riding horseback from Santa Fe all the way to Washington, D.C. I invited him to spend the night with us, and he did. Interesting fellow.
I met this “mountain man,” Chuck Streeper at a ranch sale southwest of Lavern, Oklahoma one snowy day early in 1986. He was riding horseback from Santa Fe all the way to Washington, D.C. I invited him to spend the night with us, and he did. Interesting fellow.

 

 

I was a member of "The Writers of the Purple Sage," a fine group of writers who met in Woodward, Oklahoma each month for supper and a round-table discussion. In 1986 we published  this book, with many of us contributing a chapter.
I was a member of “The Writers of the Purple Sage,” a fine group of writers who met in Woodward, Oklahoma each month for supper and a round-table discussion. In 1986 we published this book, with many of us contributing a chapter.

 

I was a member of "The Writers of the Purple Sage," a fine group of writers who met in Woodward, Oklahoma each month for supper and a round-table discussion. In 1986 we published  this book, with many of us contributing a chapter.
I was a member of “The Writers of the Purple Sage,” a fine group of writers who met in Woodward, Oklahoma each month for supper and a round-table discussion. In 1986 we published this book, with many of us contributing a chapter.

 

1986--037--WoodwardOK--book--StanParegien--barber--Carlisle--Page2of4

I was a member of "The Writers of the Purple Sage," a fine group of writers who met in Woodward, Oklahoma each month for supper and a round-table discussion. In 1986 we published  this book, with many of us contributing a chapter.
I was a member of “The Writers of the Purple Sage,” a fine group of writers who met in Woodward, Oklahoma each month for supper and a round-table discussion. In 1986 we published this book, with many of us contributing a chapter.

 

I was a member of "The Writers of the Purple Sage," a fine group of writers who met in Woodward, Oklahoma each month for supper and a round-table discussion. In 1986 we published  this book, with many of us contributing a chapter.
I was a member of “The Writers of the Purple Sage,” a fine group of writers who met in Woodward, Oklahoma each month for supper and a round-table discussion. In 1986 we published this book, with many of us contributing a chapter.

 

At the 1986 convention of Western Writers in Fort Worth, Texas I got to meet legendary novelist Jack Schaffer ("SHANE") and non-fiction writer and author Marc Simmons, both of New Mexico. I later interviewed Mr. Schaffer by telephone. Photo by Stan Paregien.
At the 1986 convention of Western Writers in Fort Worth, Texas I got to meet legendary novelist Jack Schaefer (“SHANE”) and non-fiction writer and author Marc Simmons, both of New Mexico. I later interviewed Mr. Schaefer by telephone. Photo by Stan Paregien.

 

 

Stan Paregien (right) with one of the most prolific Western novelists ever, J.T. Edson of England. He was quite a character. His characters were like those out of a "B-Western" movie, but at my last count he had seen over 130 of his books published. Photo by Peggy Paregien at the 1986 convention of the Western Writers of America, in Fort Worth, Texas.
Stan Paregien (right) with one of the most prolific Western novelists ever, J.T. Edson of England. He was quite a character. His characters were like those out of a “B-Western” movie, but at my last count he had seen over 130 of his books published. Photo by Peggy Paregien at the 1986 convention of the Western Writers of America, in Fort Worth, Texas.

 

These were two of our really fun writing friends, Stanley Locke ("Ormley Gumfudgin") and Richard ("Dick") House. Photo by Stan Paregien at the 1986 convention in Fort Worth, Texas of the Western Writers of America.
These were two of our really fun writing friends, Stanley Locke (“Ormley Gumfudgin”) and Richard (“Dick”) C. House. Photo by Stan Paregien at the 1986 convention in Fort Worth, Texas of the Western Writers of America.

 

Prolific Western novelists J.T. Edson and Mark Roberts.  Photo by Stan Paregien at the 1986 convention in Fort Worth, Texas of the Western Writers of America.
Prolific Western novelists J.T. Edson and Mark Roberts. Photo by Stan Paregien at the 1986 convention in Fort Worth, Texas of the Western Writers of America.

 

Prolific Western novelist and banjo player Benjamin Capps.  Photo by Stan Paregien at the 1986 convention in Fort Worth, Texas of the Western Writers of America.
Prolific Western novelist and banjo player Benjamin Capps. Photo by Stan Paregien at the 1986 convention in Fort Worth, Texas of the Western Writers of America.

 

Cowboy crooner and writer Don Edwards. This was the first time we heard him sing and play his guitar, but we got to hear him dozens of times over the next 25 years.  Photo by Stan Paregien at the 1986 convention in Fort Worth, Texas of the Western Writers of America.
Cowboy crooner and writer Don Edwards. This was the first time we heard him sing and play his guitar, but we got to hear him dozens of times over the next 25 years. Photo by Stan Paregien at the 1986 convention in Fort Worth, Texas of the Western Writers of America.

 

"Jeremiah Johnson Paregien" (aka, Stan) in the mountain man outfit which Peggy Paregien secretly ordered from a woman (trapper and seamstress) in Thermopolis, Wyoming after we attended the Western Writers Convention in Sheridan, Wyoming in July of 1986. Photo by Peggy Paregien
“Jeremiah Johnson Paregien” (aka, Stan) in the mountain man outfit which Peggy Paregien secretly ordered from a woman (trapper and seamstress) in Thermopolis, Wyoming after we attended the Western Writers Convention in Sheridan, Wyoming in July of 1986. Photo by Peggy Paregien

 

Western author and entertainer John Erickson, creator of the "Hank the Cowdog" series of books and songs and more. Behind him are Stacy Paregien and her California cousin Brad Loffswold. Photo taken at the Log Cabin Cafe south of Laverne, Okla., in 1986 by Stan Paregien
Western author and entertainer John Erickson, creator of the “Hank the Cowdog” series of books and songs and more. Behind him are Stacy Paregien and her California cousin Brad Loffswold. Photo taken at the Log Cabin Cafe south of Laverne, Okla., in 1986 by Stan Paregien

 

Stan Paregien aboard one of rancher Mark Mayo's beautiful Arabian horses. Photo taken by Mark Mayo at his ranch northeast of Beaver, Oklahoma in 1986.
Stan Paregien aboard one of rancher Mark Mayo’s beautiful Arabian horses. Photo taken by Mark Mayo at his ranch northeast of Beaver, Oklahoma in 1986.

 

Rancher Mark Mayo on one of his beautiful Arabian horses. Photo taken by Stan Paregien at the Mayo Ranch northeast of Beaver, Oklahoma in 1986.
Rancher Mark Mayo on one of his beautiful Arabian horses. Photo taken by Stan Paregien at the Mayo Ranch northeast of Beaver, Oklahoma in 1986.

 

Stan and Peggy Paregien at Laverne, Oklahoma in 1986. These were one set of their special square dancing outfits. That dancing and some strict dieting got them down to about as slim as they were when they married. Photo probably by daughter Stacy Paregien, in 1986.
Stan and Peggy Paregien at Laverne, Oklahoma in 1986. These were one set of their special square dancing outfits. That dancing and some strict dieting got them down to about as slim as they were when they married. Photo probably by daughter Stacy Paregien, in 1986.

 

Stan Paregien in a photo taken at the office of the WOODWARD NEWS (Woodward, Okla.) for use in a story announcing that Stan would be a regional editor, responsible for stories and photos for much of the area far west of Woodward. 1986.
Stan Paregien in a photo taken at the office of the WOODWARD NEWS (Woodward, Okla.) for use in a story announcing that Stan would be a regional editor, responsible for stories and photos for much of the area far west of Woodward. 1986.

Well, as you might have noticed, we have not posted any photos from 1987 in this section. However, you’ll find plenty of ’em if you’ll just look at my post back on June 13, 2014. It is titled, “1987: Western Writers of America Convention.”

Thanks, friends and neighbors, for stopping by to visit a spell. Be sure to check back periodically for updates. Or just sign up to “Follow” this blog and you’ll get a notice each time one is posted. Adios for now. –Stan

My Cowboy Roots, Part 2: 1964 to 1979

Stan Paregien on Carmack Sullivan's horse, near Chestnut Ridge, Tennessee in 1964. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Stan Paregien on Carmack Sullivan’s horse, near Chestnut Ridge, Tennessee in 1964. Photo by Peggy Paregien

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1964-054---ArahSmith-BillySmith-PeggyParegien--Tenn

Two of our dear Christian friends were poor Tennessee tobacco farmers, Arah and Billy Smith. They lived in an unpainted shanty with floors so slanted your gravy would run off the edge of your plate if you were not careful. They were like grandparents to us, and we still miss their love and hospitality. Note that their “team” was a mule and a horse, nothing like a matched set.

Stan Paregien with his son, Stan Paregien Jr ("Gene") in 1967 at their home in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Stan had just bought that new pair of boots down in Juarez, Mexico. The soles were rotten and didn't last more than four months.
Stan Paregien with his son, Stan Paregien Jr (“Gene”) in 1967 at their home in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Stan had just bought that new pair of boots down in Juarez, Mexico. The soles were rotten and didn’t last more than four months. Son Gene was already working on his musical talent.
Fort Seldon, a relic of Civil War days, north of Las Cruces, New Mexico.
Fort Selden, a relic of Civil War days, north of Las Cruces, New Mexico.
Peggy and Stan Paregien with son Gene at the ruins of old Fort Seldon, north of Las Cruces, NM, in 1967.
Peggy and Stan Paregien with son Gene at the ruins of old Fort Selden, north of Las Cruces, NM, in 1967. Ladies, dig Peggy’s upscale hairdo (thanks to the wind).
Stan Paregien with son Gene and friends Jack and Rachel Jackson, all of us from Las Cruces, NM. This was where we camped in a national park near Cloudcroft, New Mexico.
Stan Paregien with son Gene and friends Jack and Rachel Jackson, all of us from Las Cruces, NM. This was where we camped in a national park near Cloudcroft, New Mexico.
Aw, yes, a roaring campfire, friends and family, and a good cup of coffee. Not a bad way to end the day in a forest near Cloudcroft, NM in 1967. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Aw, yes, a roaring campfire, friends and family, and a good cup of coffee. Not a bad way to end the day in a forest near Cloudcroft, NM in 1967. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Stanley Eugene ("Gene") Paregien, Jr., starts his young life off right: in the saddle on a horse. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 1968. Photo by Stan Paregien
Stanley Eugene (“Gene”) Paregien, Jr., starts his young life off right: in the saddle on a horse. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 1968. Photo by Stan Paregien
Stanley Eugene ("Gene") Paregien, Jr., starts his young life off right: in the saddle on a horse. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in 1968. Photo by Stan Paregien
Stanley Eugene (“Gene”) Paregien, Jr., starts his young life off right: in the saddle on a horse. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in 1968. Photo by Stan Paregien
Stanley Eugene ("Gene") Paregien, Jr., on a horse and with his cousin, Diana Cauthen making sure he stayed in the saddle. West of Jay, Oklahoma in 1968. Photo by Stan Paregien
Stanley Eugene (“Gene”) Paregien, Jr., on a horse and with his cousin, Diana Cauthen making sure he stayed in the saddle. West of Jay, Oklahoma in 1968. Photo by Stan Paregien
Stan Paregien with son Stanley Eugene ("Gene") Paregien, Jr., on one of Johnnie Cauthen's horses. West of Jay, Oklahoma in 1968. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Stan Paregien with son Stanley Eugene (“Gene”) Paregien, Jr., on one of Johnnie Cauthen’s horses. West of Jay, Oklahoma in 1968. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Foolin' around on Halloween in 1969 at our house in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (near the Mayfair Church of Christ on NW 50th Street). That cowboy sure has a pot belly, and that saloon girl needs a shave and a facelift or two.
Foolin’ around on Halloween in 1969 at our house in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (near the Mayfair Church of Christ on NW 50th Street). That cowboy sure has a pot belly, and that saloon girl needs a shave and a facelift or two.
Stanley Eugene ("Gene") Paregien, Jr., rides the Christmas trail in 1969 with his stick horse. Oklahoma City, Okla. Photo by Stan Paregien
Stanley Eugene (“Gene”) Paregien, Jr., rides the Christmas trail in 1969 with his stick horse. Oklahoma City, Okla. Photo by Stan Paregien

 

Stanley Eugene ("Gene") Paregien, Jr., rides a horse with his cousin Doug Loffswold. West of Jay, Oklahoma in 1971. Photo by Peggy Paregien.
Stanley Eugene (“Gene”) Paregien, Jr., rides a horse with his cousin Doug Loffswold. West of Jay, Oklahoma in 1971. Photo by Peggy Paregien.
Gene Paregien and his dog Judy out front of "the old home place." That was the old farm house and 10 acres we bought late in 1970 some seven miles north and one mile west of Stroud, Okla. (north side of the road). We made some wonderful memories out there.
Gene Paregien and his dog Judy out front of “the old home place.” That was the old farm house and 10 acres we bought late in 1970 some seven miles north and one mile west of Stroud, Okla. (north side of the road). We made some wonderful memories out there.
Have you ever heard the expression, "Shoot low, boys, they're riding shetlands." This may be the origin. Stan Paregien is obviously too big or Shag is too small. That's why, though you can't tell it, Stan is resting heavily on his left leg away from the camera.  This 1972 photo was by Peggy Paregien.
Have you ever heard the expression, “Shoot low, boys, they’re riding shetlands”? This may be the origin. Stan Paregien is obviously too big or Shag is too small. That’s why, though you can’t tell it, Stan is resting heavily on his left leg away from the camera. This 1972 photo was by Peggy Paregien.
Stan Paregien stands by as son Gene rides bareback on our pinto horse named Daisy. 1972 photo by Peggy Paregien
Stan Paregien stands by as son Gene rides bareback on our pinto horse named Daisy. 1972 photo by Peggy Paregien
Peggy Paregien rides the owlhoot trail on Daisy, with faithful canine Kai. 1972 photo at Stroud, Okla., by Stan Paregien
Peggy Paregien rides the owlhoot trail on Daisy, with faithful canine Kai. 1972 photo at Stroud, Okla., by Stan Paregien
Gene Paregien and his mom, Peggy, ride double on our horse named Daisy. Stroud, Okla., in 1972. Photo by Stan Paregien
Gene Paregien and his mom, Peggy, ride double on our horse named Daisy. Stroud, Okla., in 1972. Photo by Stan Paregien
Gene Paregien on Daisy in front of our old, unpainted hay barn. Later, when we did paint it red, it soaked us many gallons of paint like a thirsty sponge. 1972 photo by Stan Paregien
Gene Paregien on Daisy in front of our old, unpainted hay barn. Later, when we did paint it red, it soaked up many gallons of paint like a thirsty sponge. 1972 photo by Stan Paregien
Peggy Paregien and son Gene and horse Daisy on a winter day north of Stroud, Okla., in 1972. Photo by Stan Paregien
Peggy Paregien and son Gene and horse Daisy on a winter day north of Stroud, Okla., in 1972. Photo by Stan Paregien

1972-016-Gene-Stan-onHorses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Gene Paregien stands in the woods north of Stroud, Okla., in 1972 holding his father’s vintage .22 Remington Pump rifle. Stan’s parents bought that rifle for him in about 1953.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Gene Paregien is on his horse Shag while his uncle Tim Allen is on our horse Daisy. Photo taken north of Stroud, Okla., in 1972 by Peggy Paregien

 

 

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Gene Paregien in 1972 proudly stands by his shetland horse, Shag. At that time Gene could already ride like the wind, either with a saddle or without. He really loved that little horse and had a world of fun on it.

1972-038-WoodyAllen-Gene-horses

This photo taken north of Stroud, Okla., in 1972 shows Gene Paregien riding Shag bareback and his maternal grandfather, W.W. (“Woody”) Allen, riding our horse Daisy. Moments later they took off or a little trail ride. At some point Gene got tickled by something Woody said or did, tickled enough to lose his balance and fall off of Shag. That’s when the horse’s hoof stepped squarely on the end of one of Gene’s fingers, mashing it so much that the doctor had to remove the nail. That really cooled down his enthusiasm for riding horses.

On a winter day in 1972, Stan Paregien rides Daisy and Gene rides Shag. North of Stroud, Okla. Photo by Peggy Paregien.
On a winter day in 1972, Stan Paregien rides Daisy and Gene rides Shag. North of Stroud, Okla. Photo by Peggy Paregien.
Stan Paregien at Gooch's Pond, north of Stroud, Okla., in 1972. Photo by Peggy Paregin
Stan Paregien at Gooch’s Pond, north of Stroud, Okla., in 1972. Photo by Peggy Paregien

 

 

 

 

 

1972-053B-VadaCauthen-onHorse

This is the only photo known to exist of Stan Paregien’s maternal grandmother, Mrs. John (Vada Walters) Cauthen, being on a horse. It was taken by Stan Paregien north of Stroud, Okla., in 1972.

1972-058-xmas-Stan-Gene-vestsByPeggy

Peggy Paregien made these matching shirts and vests for the two men in her life: Gene and Stan Paregien. Photo taken north of Stroud, Okla., at Christmas of 1972 by Peggy Paregien.

 

1972-081--StroudOK--GeneParegien -- Peggy - horses

1972-053A-Evelyn-Gene-onHorses

Gene Paregien rides Shag while his paternal grandmother, Mrs. Harold (Evelyn Cauthen) Paregien, rides Daisy on our place north of Stroud, Okla. Photo by Stan Paregien

Stan Paregien and son Gene hold up a stringer of fish, small though they may be, which they caught in beautiful Blue River near Tishomingo, Oklahoma in 1973. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Stan Paregien and son Gene hold up a stringer of fish, small though they may be, which they caught in beautiful Blue River near Tishomingo, Oklahoma in 1973. Photo by Peggy Paregien
This photo shows Stacy Paregien standing with our friend Fred Suffridge while his two daughters enjoy a ride on our horse Shag. Taken in 1973 north of Stroud, Okla., by Stan Paregien.
This photo shows Stacy Paregien standing with our friend Fred Suffridge while his two daughters enjoy a ride on our horse Shag. Taken in 1973 north of Stroud, Okla., by Stan Paregien.
Stan Paregien tries to catch a little nap--which he seldom ever did or does (ha-ha)--while son Gene and daughter Stacy enjoy the great outdoors down at the Gooch's Pond north of Stroud, Okla.. Photo taken in 1973 by Peggy Paregien
Stan Paregien tries to catch a little nap–which he seldom ever did or does (ha-ha)–while son Gene and daughter Stacy enjoy the great outdoors down at the Gooch’s Pond north of Stroud, Okla.. Photo taken in 1973 by Peggy Paregien
Stan Paregien holds Stacy as they ride our horse Daisy and Gene rides Shag. Photo taken north of Stroud, Okla., in 1973 by Peggy Paregien
Stan Paregien holds Stacy as they ride our horse Daisy and Gene rides Shag. Photo taken north of Stroud, Okla., in 1973 by Peggy Paregien
This 1974 photo shows what the well-dressed country girl--in this case, Peggy Paregien--used to wear on a winter morning to go out and milk cows and goats. Taken at our place north of Stroud, Okla., by Stan Paregien
This 1974 photo shows what the well-dressed country girl–in this case, Peggy Paregien–used to wear on a winter morning to go out and milk cows and goats. Taken at our place north of Stroud, Okla., by Stan Paregien
Stacy Paregien in wintertime in 1974 at our place north of Stroud, Okla. Photo by Stan Paregien.
Stacy Paregien in wintertime in 1974 at our place north of Stroud, Okla. Photo by Stan Paregien.
Stacy Paregien, who loved animals and still does, gives our shetland Shag a refreshing drink from the water hose in 1974. Taken at our place north of Stroud, Okla., by Peggy Paregien
Stacy Paregien, who loved animals and still does, gives our shetland Shag a refreshing drink from the water hose in 1974. Taken at our place north of Stroud, Okla., by Peggy Paregien
Gene Paregien and sister Stacy Paregien riding a merry-go-round at Kearny, Nebraska in 1975. We rode with friends Ray and Frances Rutledge from Council Bluffs, Iowa. Photo by Stan Paregien
Gene Paregien and sister Stacy Paregien riding a merry-go-round at Kearny, Nebraska in 1975. We rode with friends Ray and Frances Rutledge from Council Bluffs, Iowa. Photo by Stan Paregien
This rather striking cowboy couple is none other than Peggy Allen Paregien's parents, Woody and Pauline Allen, dressed up for a party at an insurance convention in Arizona in 1975.
This rather striking cowboy couple is none other than Peggy Allen Paregien’s parents, Woody and Pauline Allen, dressed up for a party at an insurance convention in Arizona in 1975.
Peggy Paregien doctors our gift horse's hoofs which were neglected and grew out way too long. Photo taken north of Stroud, Okla., in 1977 by Stan Paregien.
Peggy Paregien doctors our gift horse’s hoofs which were neglected and grew out way too long. Photo taken north of Stroud, Okla., in 1977 by Stan Paregien.
Peggy Paregien doctors our gift horse's hoofs which were neglected and grew out way too long. Photo taken north of Stroud, Okla., in 1977 by Stan Paregien.
Peggy Paregien doctors our gift horse’s hoofs which were neglected and grew out way too long. Photo taken north of Stroud, Okla., in 1977 by Stan Paregien.
Gene Paregien enjoys a ride on his horse Shag on a warm day in the winter of 1977 at Stroud, Okla. Photo by Stan Paregien
Gene Paregien enjoys a ride on his horse Shag on a warm day in the winter of 1977 at Stroud, Okla. Photo by Stan Paregien
Gene Paregien and sister Stacy enjoy a ride on his horse Shag on a warm day in the winter of 1977 at Stroud, Okla. Photo by Stan Paregien
Gene Paregien and sister Stacy enjoy a ride on his horse Shag on a warm day in the winter of 1977 at Stroud, Okla. Photo by Stan Paregien
Stacy Paregien enjoys a ride on our horse Shag on a warm day in the winter of 1977 at Stroud, Okla. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Stacy Paregien enjoys a ride on our horse Shag on a warm day in the winter of 1977 at Stroud, Okla. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Gene Paregien and sister Stacy enjoy a ride on his horse Shag 1977 at Stroud, Okla. Photo by Stan Paregien
Gene Paregien and sister Stacy enjoy a ride on his horse Shag 1977 at Stroud, Okla. Photo by Stan Paregien
Stacy Paregien and brother Gene help haul to the house a cedar tree cut down on Gooch's land, next to us. It was our Christmas tree in December of 1979. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Stacy Paregien and brother Gene help haul to the house a cedar tree cut down on Gooch’s land, next to us. It was our Christmas tree in December of 1979. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Stan Paregien with son Gene and daughter Stacy as they haul to the house a cedar tree cut down on Gooch's land, next to us. It was our Christmas tree in December of 1979. North of Stroud, Okla. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Stan Paregien with son Gene and daughter Stacy as they haul to the house a cedar tree cut down on Gooch’s land, next to us. It was our Christmas tree in December of 1979. North of Stroud, Okla. Photo by Peggy Paregien
This photo shows what the well-dressed cowboy and cowgirl wore in 1979. Taken north of Stroud, Okla. by Peggy Paregien.
This photo shows what the well-dressed cowboy and cowgirl wore in 1979. Taken north of Stroud, Okla. by Peggy Paregien.
Gene Paregien with our two dogs, "Dog 1" and "Dog 2" (Judy), north of Stroud, Okla., in 1979. Photo by Stan Paregien
Gene Paregien with our two dogs, “Dog 1” and “Dog 2” (Judy), north of Stroud, Okla., in 1979. Photo by Stan Paregien
Peggy Paregien helps haul to the house a cedar tree cut down on Gooch's land, next to us. It was our Christmas tree in December of 1979. Photo by Stan Paregien
Peggy Paregien helps haul to the house a cedar tree cut down on Gooch’s land, next to us. It was our Christmas tree in December of 1979. Photo by Stan Paregien
Gene Paregien and sister Stacy in a pasture near our place north of Stroud, Okla., in 1979. Photo by Peggy Paregien
Gene Paregien and sister Stacy in a pasture near our place north of Stroud, Okla., in 1979. Photo by Peggy Paregien

Well, neighbors, that is about it for this second segment of my cowboy roots. One more section to go, that being from 1980 to 1987. 

Until then, ride safe and ride for the brand. Or as they say in Oklahoma and Texas, “Dance with them what brung you here.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Cowboy Roots, Part 1: 1943–1954

Howdy y’all:

Thought I’d take another ride down the ol’ memory trail. Hope you’ll come along, as we are traveling far back in time and space to a whole ‘nother world. The world of my youth, from 1943 to 1954.

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Dig those fancy cowboy boots. Eh, I was always told they were cowboy boots. Looking at ’em up close and personal, heck, they kinda look like something band majorettes might wear. Shucks, couldn’t be. Cowboy boots kinda emphasized my muscular legs, right?

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I’m not real sure, but I think Edna May ran off with a 6-year old rich kid. I don’t know who she was and I don’t think I ever saw the sweetie pie again. Oh, say, about that haircut. No, not hers. Mine. For some reason, I decided that I wanted to be a barber when I grew up but I could not see any good reason why I should wait that long. So I began my barber practice by practicing on myself — hence the big gap in the front part of my hair. That new-style hair cut did not spark a wave of copycats.

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My mom, Evelyn Cauthen Paregien, was a woman of many talents. One of them, in her early years, was sewing. She made me the Western shirt I’m wearing as well as the whole outfit (minus the hat) that my sister Roberta is wearing in this photo.

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If there ever was a fake fight, this one takes the prize. I am wearing another cowboy outfit made by my mother. You can see that I am clearly beating up on my badly outnumbered and outfoxed cousin Jerry Paregien. Or is it that he is knocking me around like a punching bag? Kinda hard to tell, the fists were flying so fast. This boxing exhibition took place in 1949 at our company-provided house on the Todd Estate Ranch about three miles west of Santa Paula, Calif.

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Here I am in 1952, armed and dangerous with my Red Ryder BB gun. Sure wish I had that thing today.

 

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It does on occasion get mighty nippy in sunny southern California. Somebody left a water sprinkler on overnight and this was the result. Hey, was this my long-lost first love, Edna May Burger maybe? Naw.

 

 

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The above is one of my favorite photos from my youth. We had made a trip to Tulsa, Oklahoma to see my mother’s folks (John and Vada Cauthen) for Christmas. And on the way back to Newhall, California, we encountered a really big snow storm. So my father, Harold Paregien, took a photo of my sister Roberta and my mom Evelyn and me playing in the snow on the edge of Flagstaff, Arizona. Those doggone snowflakes still hold the record in my book as being the largest ones I’ve ever seen. It was beautiful, especially with all the pine tree covered mountains in that area.

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That is a railroad track crossing there to the right of Tony’s nose. And just on the other side of that was (and is) Highway 126. That railroad track is no longer there, and neither is the company-owned house in which we lived. The house was located just a hundred yards or so inside the Los Angeles County line.

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The horse Tony turned out to be far too head-strong for my sister to control. So our dad bought the horse on the right named Little Bit, and it was a really gentle, good horse for Roberta to ride. We spent a lot of time riding through the mountains surrounding our house, all of it the property of Newhall Land and Farming Company. Our father farmed the English walnut orchards there in the flatlands.

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Roberta and I rode in a parade at nearby Val Verde, California in 1954, along with our saddle pal Ann Walker. Her father, Slim Walker, also worked for the Newhall Ranch (her mother’s name was Tess Walker). The red marker on the left is Roberta on Little Bit, then the next red marker shows me on Taffy, and the third is Ann Walker on her horse.

 

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Roberta on Little Bit in 1954

 

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This was my father’s brother, Bueford Paregien, and his family. They had one more daughter after this photo was taken. As you can see, they were kinda into the cowboy thing, too. That is my cousin Roger Paregien on the left, then Bobby Paregien and Danny Paregien. They all stuck pretty close to Bakersfield for decades.

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Stan on Taffy, with the railroad track behind them and Highway 126 on the other side

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For whatever reason, now lost in the maze of history, my parents decided to leave California and move back to Tulsa, Oklahoma. Perhaps my mom just figured it was time to live close to her parents for a change. I don’t know. What I do know is that we had to sell our horses and about 18 years would pass before I would owe a horse, again.

Those were wonderful days there on the Newhall Ranch. Lots of wide-open spaces to explore. Lots of relatives and friends in and out all the time. Just very good years. And through it all, I went to the movies to see the latest adventures of Roy Rogers, Gene Autry, Rex Allen, Jimmy Wakely, Tex Ritter, Gregory Peck, John Wayne and dozens more. It just couldn’t have been much better than that for a kid in love with the cowboy way of life.

Thanks for droppin’ by. Come back soon, ya hear?

—Cowboy Stan Paregien

 

 

 

1987: Western Writers of America Convention

1987--028--Stan-Peg--DeadwoodSD--June

 

“Slick” Paregien and his saloon gal, Persimmon Juice Peggy

Deadwood, S.D. in 1877. Oh, wait. Make that 1987.

In 1987, while living 48 miles away from civilization–that’s how far we were from the nearest McDonald’s or Walmart–we left dear ol’ Laverne, Oklahoma in late June to head north to Sheridan, Wyoming. That very nice city was where the annual convention of the Western Writers of America was being held that year.

Peggy and I also took along our teenage daughter, Stacy, and her teenie-bopper friend Belinda Bond. We loaded up and off we went. Up through the heartland of America, through Kansas and east to Wyoming. There was frost on our windshield when we got up to eat breakfast in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Beautiful country and it was about to get even better.

We traveled up through the majestic snow-capped Tetons (the French trappers named them such, saying that looked like . . . eh, well . . . let us say, ample breasts . . . if you get my drift). Then we spent several hours ooo-ing and awww-ing at Yellowstone’s marvelous river, lakes, geysers, waterfalls, mountains and animals. We spent a couple of nights at a lovely and rustic log-cabin resort close to the east entrance to Yellowstone. We all went horseback riding the next morning.

1987--033-A-- Peggy Paregien on horseback west of Cody, WY  -  June

 

1987--033-B-- Stan Paregien on horseback west of Cody, WY  -  June

 

After a peaceful night’s rest, we drove the fairly short distance to Cody, Wyoming and got a motel. We toured the fabulous Buffalo Bill Cody Museum and some of the other local sites, including “Old Trail Town western town.” The owner–Bob Edgar, an artist as well–had brought to one location (on the west side of Cody) maybe two-dozen or more historic cabins (think hiding place of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid), school houses, saloons, ranch houses, etc. He was on site that day and gave us a personal tour of several buildings, then we bought a couple of paintings of his and said adios.

 

1987--033-C--CodyWY--BobEdgar--StanParegien--OldTrailTown--byPP

Then it was a scenic drive over the Big Horn Mountains to the valley where the Holiday Inn at Sheridan, Wyoming was located. This was my third WWA convention, as in 1984 at Jory Sherman’s invitation I attended the convention in Branson, Missouri. I missed the next convention in 1985. But both Peggy and I attended the 1986 convention in downtown Fort Worth, with excursions to the “Cowtown” district and other location.

One evening we all were loaded onto tour buses and taken to the Eaton Ranch, sorta southeast of Sheridan (though I wouldn’t guarantee that direction). It is a huge ranch and mining company. Well, the mining company part comes from mining the pockets of tourists like us. Still, it was a great experience. We had a wonderful bar-b-que diner and then music and some dancing. Mighty nice, indeed.

 

1987--036--SheridanWY--June--StanParegien--taking-photos-at-EatonRanch-WolfWY

 

 

1987--037--WolfWY--June23--CherylMetz--ValGeissler--EatonRanch---bySP

 

On one day we took a trip to the Custer Battlefield National Monument & Cemetery near Hardin, Montana. It was a moving experience standing on that peaceful hillside and imaging the awful carnage and loss of life which took place that day when General Custer was badly out-numbered and his command virtually wiped out.

1987--038--HardinMT--CusterBattlefield--PeggyParegien----bySP

1987--039--D--Hardin, MT---WWA Luncheon-Powwow - Bill Gulick -- by Stan Paregien

Bill Gulick, author of THE HALLELUJAH TRAIL and many other books,

stands at the foot of the tombstone of Walter Stanley Campbell, his mentor

and professor at the University of Oklahoma. Photo by Stan Paregien

1987--039--E--Hardin, MT---WWA Luncheon-Powwow - Elmer Kelton and Bill Gulick -- by Stan Paregien

Elmer Kelton, prolific Texas novelist, with Bill Gulick.

Photo by Stan Paregien

1987--039--F--Hardin, MT---WWA Luncheon-Powwow - Paul Dyck and others -- by Stan Paregien

1987--039--A--Hardin, MT---NationalCemetery-- Bill Gullick ------bySP

1987--039--B--Hardin, MT---WWA Luncheon-Powwow - Carolyn Leonard -- by Stan Paregien

Our friend, Carolyn Leonard–noted freelance writer and genealogist, gets in the swing

of things with the young Indian dancers. Photo by Stan Paregien

 

1987--039--C--Hardin, MT---WWA Luncheon-Powwow - Gulick, Brown and Evans -- by Stan Paregien

 

This trio had a ton of talent. L to R are Bill Guilick, Dee Brown (BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE) and

New Mexico’s legendary author, artist and rounder–ol’ Max Evans (THE ROUNDERS). Photo by Stan Paregien

1987--039--G--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - David Dary  -- by Stan Paregien

David Dary

 

D1987--040--H--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - group  -- by Stan Paregien

Richard (“Dick”) House, Dusty Richards, ___________ (unidentified woman), Mel Marshall,

Mark Roberts, Elmer Kelton and Preston Lewis

1987--040--I--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - Loren Estelman and group  -- by Stan Paregien

Loren Estelman

 

1987--040--J--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - Mark Roberts  -- by Stan Paregien

Mark Roberts

 

1987--040--K--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - C L Sonnichsen  -- by Stan Paregien

 

1987--040--L--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - Mr and Mrs Jack Cummings with Frank Roderus  -- by Stan Paregien

Jack Cummings and Frank Roderus

 

1987--040--M--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - Robert J Randisi  -- by Stan Paregien

 

1987--040--N--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - two writers  -- by Stan Paregien

 

1987--040--O--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - James L Collins and Robert Conley  -- by Stan Paregien

James L. Collins and Robert Conley

 

 

1987--040--P--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - Barbara Ketchum and Gary  -- by Stan Paregien

 

1987--040--Q--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - soldiers  -- by Stan Paregien

1987--040--R--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - Matthew Braun and wife  -- by Stan Paregien

Matthew Braun

 

1987--040--SheridanWY--WWAconvetion--FrancisFugate-Roberta-----bySP

Francis and Robert Fugate

1987--040--S--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - Elmer Kelton  -- by Stan Paregien

1987--040--T--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - Peggy Paregien with Roseanne Bittner  -- by Stan Paregien

Peggy Paregien with novelist Roseanne Bittner

 

1987--040--U--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - Peggy Paregien with a book editor  -- by Stan Paregien

Peggy Paregien with a book editor 

 

1987--040--V--Sheridan, WY --- WWA Convention - Don Coldsmith, Roseanne Bittner, Jim Bob Tinsley  -- by Stan Paregien

Don Coldsmith visits with Roseanne Bittner. In the background are

Jim Bob Tinsley and wife Doty Tinsley, very dear people to us.

 

1987--041--A--SheridanWY--WWAconvetion--DeeBrown-----bySP

Dee Brown

 

1987--041--B--SheridanWY--FrankRoderus-PegParegien-bySP

 Frank Roderus and Peggy Paregien in 1987. Frank has hung his Stetson (not pictured)

here in Florida for many, many years now. And he is still writing Western fiction.

 

Well, sir, Peggy and I (and our two girls) saddled up and rode out of Sheridan, Wyoming early one morning. The last few days had been a feast of food, renewing friendships and meeting new folks, and finding out what was working and not working in the world of Western writing (fiction and non-fiction). It had been a great time.

See ya down the trail.

–“Cowboy Stan” Paregien

Bradenton, Florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A New Poem and a New Photo

Hello,

I have written a new poem titled, “Grandma’s 100th Birthday Anniversary”. It is a trip down nostalia lane, with a definite twist. Hope you enjoy it. [Just click on the graphics to enlarge them.]

 

 

Also, I got to play a rootin’ tootin’ cowboy at church this morning. I was invited to do a little cowboy skit for a preschool group of kids, and the contact person gave me a script of what I was supposed to do for two to three minutes.

That was the first problem.

Hey, I don’t really admit that my short-term memory is going south on me . . . but it is getting harder and harder for me to memorize information. I really have to sweat over that new stuff. So I got started on the material several days in advance and then winged it as best I could. Of course, the kids didn’t know when or if I left something out. And I didn’t know either, until it was all over. They really roared when I got them to shouting the cowboy “hello” — “Howdy, pardner! Yee-haw!”

Anyway, I enjoyed the kids and they seemed to get a kick out of what must be the wierdest ol’ cowhand they’ve seen in a blue moon. The director asked me to do two more skits on two different Sundays. So it’s back to my “homework”.

Hope you had a good week last week. Join me in looking forward to this new week and to being watchful for someone you meet to whom you can be a blessing.

TODAY’S QUOTE:

“Do all the good you can for all the people you can.”  – Louis Klopsch, first editor of the Christian Herald magazine. He also edited and published in 1899 the world’s first Bible with the words of Jesus Christ printed with red ink.

Gotta go, so “cherrio ol’ chaps”.

–Stan

 

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